Hay Fever Symptoms And The Immune System: Acupuncture Produces Lasting Improvement

Hay Fever Symptoms And The Immune System: Acupuncture Produces Lasting Improvement

Research has shown that Acupuncture is a cost-effective, safe and effective allergic rhinitis (hay fever) treatment that produces lasting improvements in symptoms and in the immune system.

The latest research not only demonstrated clear evidence that the immune system changes as a result of Acupuncture. It also showed that this natural intervention continued to improve symptoms for several weeks (even up to 3 months!) after the treatments ceased (1,2).

Can you think of a single pharmaceutical drug that could claim the same? Or even one without harmful side effects that can lead to additional problems? Whereas Acupuncture has a strong reputation as a safe intervention and is considered cost effective in the treatment of hay fever according to a German study (Witt et al, 2009).

According to the research 86.1% of participants showed significant improvement in quality of life and symptoms. Other studies support these results with positive effect rates between 84.6-95.8% (3).

Even 6 months after treatment ceased, although symptoms were starting to creep back slowly, participants in the study were still significantly better than before the study.

A short course of “top up” treatments is recommended if symptoms begin to come back after 3 months. 

The most improved symptoms in this hay fever study were: nasal itch, sneezing, nasal congestion, running nose, unrefreshed sleep and eye itch. In this particular study post-nasal drip and sinus pain did not change.

It is important to note that all prior studies that treated with Acupuncture less than twice a week and less than 12 treatments achieved far inferior results. Acupuncture is dose-dependent, so it is important to commit to the right amount of treatment. In this successful study participants received treatment twice a week for 8 weeks.

References:
1.
McDonald, J.L., Cripps, A.W., Smith, P.K., Smith, C.A., Xue, C.C. & Golianu, B. (2016) Effect of acupuncture on house dust mite specific IgE, substance P, and symptoms in persistent allergic rhinitis Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (116),6: 497–505

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2016.04.002

2. McDonald, J.L., Cripps, A.W., Smith, P.K., Smith, C.A., Xue, C.C. & Golianu, B. (2013) The Anti-inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture and Their Relevance to Allergic Rhinitis: A Narrative Review and Proposed Model. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol 2013, Article ID 591796.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/591796/

3. McDonald, J.L., Cripps, A.W., Smith, P.K. (2015) Mediators, Receptors and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol 2015, Article ID 975632.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2015/975632/